FIVE TIMES YOU DON’T HAVE TO SAY SORRY AT WORK

Let’s be honest.
Women just can’t seem to stop overusing the word sorry. Whether it’s while hanging out with your friends or at work. Off course being able to genuinely apologizing when you made an honest mistake is a beautiful character trade. But overusing the word can make you seem insincere and an indecisive doormat at the workplace. So here are five situations where you definitely should not say you’re sorry.

1. WHEN YOU HAVE NOTHING TO BE SORRY FOR
Some people tend to use it as a polite conversation filler. So before you feel like using the word sorry while having a casual conversation, ask yourself: is what I’m about to say worth apologizing for? If not, don’t say you’re sorry.

2. WHEN YOU DISAGREE 
You have no control over how other people perceive what you tell them. It’s also nonsense to feel bad about expressing your honest opinion. If you express it in a respectful way of course… Saying 'I'm sorry but I just don't agree with you' is unnecessary filler and can make you sound defensive instead of confident about offering another point of view.

3. BEFORE YOU ASKS FOR SOMETHING
We all need some help sometimes. You really don’t have to feel embarrassed about it. So no more "I'm sorry, but would you mind helping me?" or "I hate to have to ask, but could you help me with ... ?" Just ask for what you need. Heck you might even throw a compliment in there while you’re at it! Like for example: "I’ve noticed you're great with Prezi. Would you mind helping me with this presentation?"

4. WHEN YOU HAD NOTHING TO DO WITH IT
When you’re managing a team it’s likely you feel responsible for the actions of your team. This is just wonderful. But can get tricky for you in some situations. Save your apologies for when you are taking complete ownership over your own mess-ups. Try focusing on the solution and explain what went wrong, instead of taking one for the team.

 
5. WHEN SOMEONE OFFENDS YOU
"I'm sorry, but you just can't make a snarky remark like that to me."
Note to you: the person who should be saying they're sorry is the person making the snarky remark. Not you. "Saying 'I'm sorry' minimizes your own feelings and plants the seed that perhaps, just maybe, you're the one who should be sorry.

Tags: Tips, Leading Ladies, Business, Sorry, Sorry not sorry